Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Women toppling the business monopoly on childbirth

older | 1 | 2 | (Page 3) | 4 | newer

    0 0

    In this episode, Cristen speaks with Kesha Chiappinelli, an Arkansas lawyer who represents consumers working for better midwifery regulations.  Right now, for example, the law requires a number of vaginal exams for home birth midwifery clients–something Ms. Chiappinelli describes as “state-sanctioned rape.”  (The regulations are similar to what is described in Arizona: Mandatory Surgery or Forced Vaginal Exams.)

    SEPT. 2017 CONSUMER ALERT: The Arkansas Department of Health will hold a public hearing on September 21, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. in the Auditorium of the Arkansas Department of Health, 4815 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR in conformance with the Administrative Procedures Act, Ark. Code Ann. § 25-15-201 et seq. It is proposed to revise the Rules and Regulations Governing the Practice of Licensed Lay Midwifery in Arkansas pursuant to the Administrative Procedures Act as amended, and by authority of Ark. Code Ann. §§17-85-101 et seq. and Arkansas Code Ann. §§20-7-109.  A draft copy of the proposed revisions is here under the heading “Midwifery.” 

    Interested members of the public can submit written comments no later than 8:00 am on September 21, 2017 via

    Email at womenshealth@arkansas.gov

    Or mail to:
    Attn: Womens Health Section Chief
    Arkansas Department of Health
    4815 West Markham Street
    Women’s Health Slot # 16


    0 0

    Hermine Hayes-Klein

    In this episode of Birth Allowed Radio, we talk about what it means to say no to a procedure in the delivery room, when and if implied consent overrides refusal, and who is the boss of your body. Spoiler alert: it’s you.

    This podcast is an extension of a recent article I wrote. You can check it out here. http://birthmonopoly.com/impliedconsent/

    My special guest is lawyer and birth rights advocate Hermine Hayes-Klein. http://www.hayeskleinlaw.com/

    Let’s Talk About Consent

    Implied consent is a concept that has become skewed, in all aspects of life on the sexual spectrum, including birth. Whether we are talking about date rapists or hospital administrators, there is a lot of misinformation about what implied consent actually means.

    We are talking about the right to consent to or refuse treatments in the context of labor and delivery, as well as the absence of direct consent. This includes such things as medications, cutting or episiotomies, induction, and all other interventions and treatments, all of which can save lives when appropriate. But we also know that those interventions are massively overused. For instance, the rate of c-sections has risen from 5% nationally in the 70s, to 33% nationally. This hasn’t brought about improvements in outcomes.

    In the system in which U.S. women are giving birth, the reality is that there is an inclination by providers to use these interventions because of perceptions of things like liability risk and other incentives that impact recommendations. Rates of surgical birth range from 7% to 70% in hospitals across the United States, and studies show that is not because patient health profiles vary that drastically.

    Your right of informed consent and refusal is a critical tool to navigate the dysfunctions that occur.

    Providers often think women do not have the right to refuse, and the pushback against refusal can range from pressuring to violence.  The fact is, even if the baby is going to die, the woman retains the legal right to make decisions. (Read more here about related ethics opinions from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.)

    A great deal of the fear of the right of refusal is based on the idea that doctors can predict with accuracy the baby’s need for these interventions, yet those predictions often cannot be made with certainty.  These interventions are also not always evidence based, and the motivation to use them is often otherwise incentivized.

    A hospital admission alone does not imply consent for all interventions, and implied consent should never override explicit non-consent.

    There are gendered assumptions about female passivity and their own bodies that underlie the assumptions about consent. There is a mistrust of women contributing to this debate.

    Implied consent is also used to make it harder to litigate date rape and marital rape cases. Nonconsented birth interventions bear similarities to sexual assault, legally, and with the experience of the victim.

    Finding an advocate willing to pursue the case can also be challenging.

    So What Needs to Change?

    Training and education in our facilities needs to happen to close the gap between the ethical and legal principle that women have the right to refuse medically recommended treatment and the realities that women are experiencing on the ground in maternity care.

     

    WANT TO LEARN MORE?

    Go to www.birthmonopoly.com

    WANT TO CONNECT?

    Email: birthallowedradio@gmail.com

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/birthmonopoly

    Twitter: www.twitter.com/birthmonopoly

    Instagram:  www.instagram.com/birthmonopoly

    WANT TO SUPPORT US?

    Review us on iTunes, SoundCloud, or wherever you listen to the podcast.

    Businesses and organizations: Underwrite the show!  For more information, contact us at birthallowedradio@gmail.com

    Listen on SoundCloud or iTunes

     


    0 0

    In this episode, we talk about the world of pregnancy, breastfeeding, and marijuana use. To help make sense of this topic – and sort the science from the pearl-clutching – I brought in a special guest: Heather Thompson, PhD. Heather not only discusses the research, but helps make it relevant to worried moms and birth workers.

    Heather has a doctorate in molecular and cellular biology and has worked in clinical research in maternal and infant health for 25 years. She is now Deputy Director at the reproductive justice organization Elephant Circle. http://www.elephantcircle.net/

    First, a note about the relevance of most drug research.

    As a whole, drugs are not tested on pregnant women to see how they respond. Most drugs are tested on a “control” generally made up of white men, so those data can only ever represent the population of white men – we cannot always extrapolate drug effects onto other groups. The female metabolism, especially during pregnancy, differs greatly.

    What are the benefits of marijuana use during pregnancy/post-partum?

    During pregnancy, it is often used for morning sickness and extreme nausea (hyperemesis gravidarum), as well as migraines, pain, cancer, and other pre-existing health issues. Research indicates that about 2 to 4% of pregnant women in the U.S. use marijuana.

    It’s important to remember that for people using marijuana as medicine–for example, to relieve nausea that is preventing intake of much-needed nutrition–there is an exchange of risks and benefits. Use of marijuana is not only about risk, but about benefit, and those risks and benefits must be weighed against the alternatives. It may be more acceptable to one mother to manage severe anxiety with careful, calculated use of marijuana instead of exposing the developing fetus to prescription drugs with known risks, or in lieu of stopping anxiety medications altogether during pregnancy.

    What do the studies say?

    There are three primary longitudinal studies on perinatal marijuana use, which report that the main potential adverse newborn outcomes associated with prenatal cannabis use are pre-term birth, low birth weight, and increased NICU admissions. It is important to note that marijuana alone does not cause lower birth weight or pre-term birth, especially with moderate use. Separating out the effects of other factors, like tobacco smoking and poverty, is challenging but critical to understanding the independent effects of marijuana use.

    We have been studying marijuana for quite a long time from the perspective of looking for harm, but we haven’t shown that harm definitively. One of the primary authors on the Canadian longitudinal study, Dr. Peter Fried, says that despite decades of research, it has been found that the harms to babies are small, resolved in a few weeks or months, and that the child’s environment plays a larger role in development than marijuana itself.

    Language matters. “Harm” has punitive connotations. “Expected outcomes” helps parents make reasoned decisions and brings less loaded language into the conversation.

    What birth workers need to know.

    Investigate your state’s mandatory reporting laws. Remember that you can add narrative to reports made to Child Protective Services; nurses’ commentary about patients holds a lot of weight. Any time you feel you must act as a mandatory reporter, keep in mind that use does not equal abuse. Prenatal providers need to help clients understand both the health and the legal risks (such as investigation by child welfare services) for a complete risk/benefit analysis.

    Resources mentioned:

    “Hard labour: the case for testing drugs on pregnant women” by Emily Anthes https://mosaicscience.com/story/pregnancy-testing-drugs

    Check out Heather’s blog for more information on this topic. http://www.elephantcircle.com/circle

    WANT TO LEARN MORE?

    Go to www.birthmonopoly.com

    WANT TO CONNECT?

    Email: birthallowedradio@gmail.com

    Facebook: www.facebook.com/birthmonopoly

    Twitter: www.twitter.com/birthmonopoly

    Instagram:  www.instagram.com/birthmonopoly

    WANT TO SUPPORT US?

    Review us on iTunes, SoundCloud, or wherever you listen to the podcast.

    Businesses and organizations: Underwrite the show!  For more information, contact us at birthallowedradio@gmail.com

    Listen on SoundCloud or iTunes


    0 0

    Birth plans are women being smarter than hospitals when hospitals fail to follow humane, science-based practices. That they have to be written down and pre-approved by a doctor is evidence of how little women's decisions in birth matter.

    0 0

    My special guest is Lindsay Askins, a birth doula and birth photographer, and my partner in Exposing the Silence, a photography and interview project about birth trauma and obstetric violence. www.exposingthesilenceproject.com/

    0 0

    This case of birth monopoly is about the long-term legal prosecution of Agnes Gereb, the trailblazing Hungarian obstetrician who chose to become a midwife almost 20 years into her career so that she could support women on their own terms.

    0 0

    As part of the free Mother May I Series, we are honored to present a webinar with Dr. Sayida Peprah, hosted by Cristen Pascucci and Birth Monopoly, on Birth Trauma & Maternal Mental Health. Dr. Sayida Peprah Dr. Sayida is both a licensed clinical psychologist and a birth doula. In addition to her clinical work, she […]

    0 0

    These words came out of a growing sense of frustration that American leadership is so quick to blame women for what are actually systemic problems in maternity care.

    0 0

    Midwife Karen Webster has been investigated and charged in Maryland, Delaware and Virginia for practicing midwifery--and she says she would do it all again to ensure women can give birth on their terms.

    0 0

    When “lower” groups fight amongst themselves, they never come together and create change. Hurt and traumatized by the system, their lashing out is a side effect of the oppressive system in which they participate.

    0 0

    “There is a big gap between how providers think they are doing, and how patients think those providers are doing.” Obstetric anesthesiologist Dr. Tracey Vogel talks about how clinicians can and must do better when it comes to birth trauma.

    0 0

    Often, birth care professionals often alienate plus-size moms-to-be with shaming, inadequate equipment, and mistreatment. In this episode of Birth Allowed Radio, we talk about plus size birth and how to find a practitioner who will treat you like a person, not a set of risk factors.

    0 0

    There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

    0 0

    Kimberly Turbin made headlines and history when she sued her doctor for assault when he gave her a medically unnecessary and botched episiotomy during the birth of her child. The case was resolved in 2017, but Kimberly is still dealing with the effects of the assault.

    The post Ep. 22 – “My Injury is Forever and a Lifetime” | Kimberly Turbin appeared first on Birth Monopoly.


    0 0

    Black, overweight, on Medicaid, in Alabama, AND wanting a vaginal birth after Cesarean? Our special guest Sabrina Azemar recounts her difficulties convincing her maternal care providers to "let" her do what pregnant bodies have been doing for centuries.

    The post Ep. 21 – Birthing While Black in Alabama | Sabrina Azemar appeared first on Birth Monopoly.


    0 0

    Following a traumatic, non-consented Cesarean and dismissal of her complaints about it, Sara Conrad says, "I have a lot of rage and I want to use that to propel me forward and try to prevent it from happening to other people."

    The post Ep. 23 – After a Non-Consented C-Section, “I’ll Be Damned if This Happens To Somebody Else” | Sara Conrad appeared first on Birth Monopoly.


    0 0
    0 0

    “That doesn’t make sense, for her to wait until after she’s abused to call me. If she’s really worried about it, I can meet her at the hospital as her doula, and make sure that doesn’t happen.”

    The post When Your Lawyer is Your Doula appeared first on Birth Monopoly.


    0 0

    Alabama's abortion amendment broadly extends state and medical authority over every stage of pregnancy and birth, potentially including how and where women give birth.

    The post How An Abortion Amendment Impacts Wanted Pregnancies and Birth appeared first on Birth Monopoly.


    0 0

    If we support out-of-hospital birth, we should welcome these opportunities for growth, even when they are uncomfortable.

    The post A Call to Advocates: Compassion and Loss in Out-of-Hospital Birth appeared first on Birth Monopoly.


older | 1 | 2 | (Page 3) | 4 | newer